The Easter/April Fools’ Thing Isn’t Wrong But It May Not Apply To You

There has been a good amount of confusion about the Easter/April Fools’ meme that has been going around. You know the one, Easter and April Fools’ are on the same day this year so tell the kids to look for eggs you didn’t hide. The reason for the confusion is that Easter Sunday is March 31st this year.

People have been posting this pic quite a bit, only to have someone remind them that Easter Sunday is March 31st. The poster gets embarrassed, and then often assumes that the pic itself is an early April Fools’ day prank. This isn’t necessarily the case.

I think what this comes from is Easter Monday. Though this holiday isn’t celebrated by much of the United States, it is a holiday in many places. Though Easter Sunday isn’t on April Fool’s day this year, Easter Monday is. Thus, the meme isn’t necessarily wrong, unless it really was created by someone just trying to see if anyone would fall for the date confusion, but it may not really be applicable in most of the United States.

Contrary to popular US belief, not everything is necessarily wrong just because it doesn’t work in the US.

About David S. Atkinson

David S. Atkinson enjoys typing about himself in the third person, although he does not generally enjoy speaking in such a fashion. However, he is concerned about the Kierkegaard quote "Once you label me you negate me." He worries that if he attempts to define himself he will, in fact, nullify his existence...
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